Recipes,  Savory,  Sweet

Basic Dutch Baby + Savory Spring Dutch Baby with Hollandaise

Savory Spring Dutch Baby from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Boiled Wheat Photography, Bozeman Montana
Savory Spring Dutch Baby from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Boiled Wheat Photography, Bozeman Montana
Savory Spring Dutch Baby from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Boiled Wheat Photography, Bozeman Montana

For anyone who doesn’t follow my Instagram, Myles and I have big news: we’re chicken parents!

Even though it’s been more dreary than sunny the last while, we’re buzzing with the idea of spring. I have nearly all of my plants started (I keep saying I’m done, and then I buy more seeds… oops), and the chicks have officially entered their ugly-teen-stage. Things within the house are very much alive, just waiting to burst through the doors once the weather allows.

Really, once the man who’s building the house next door allows.

We’re situated at the top of a little hill in our little town. It’s nice during flood season (now), but also nice for gardening. We’ve got a lovely, south-facing slope to our side yard, which would be perfect if we could keep it. But we can’t. The wonderfully empty lot next to ours will be beginning construction this spring, and they’re putting in a retaining wall. *Sigh* Which also means we can’t start landscaping until that retaining wall is in. Which means…. waiting.

Savory Spring Dutch Baby from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Boiled Wheat Photography, Bozeman Montana

I would love to say that I’m a patient person, but I’m not. I’m counting down the days until the builder *estimated* the wall would be done. Oof. This blog post itself is a testament to my patience. It’s been Egg Week at my house, developing the recipe for these dutch babies, then a carbonara, and even an angel-food-like cake. Because, ever since we bought these chicks, I can’t get eggs off my mind. Do my chickens lay eggs yet? No. Am I swimming in a surplus of eggs that my chickens didn’t lay? No.

I’m just impatient. But the recipes are coming out wonderfully– so I think you’ll forgive me.

Savory Spring Dutch Baby from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Boiled Wheat Photography, Bozeman Montana
Savory Spring Dutch Baby from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Boiled Wheat Photography, Bozeman Montana
Savory Spring Dutch Baby from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Boiled Wheat Photography, Bozeman Montana
Savory Spring Dutch Baby from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Boiled Wheat Photography, Bozeman Montana

Basic Dutch Baby


1/4 c. butter
4-6 eggs
1 c. milk
1 c. flour
1/2 t. salt
2 T sugar (opt.)
1 t. vanilla (opt.)

Toppings of your choice:
berries
syrup
powdered sugar
cooked apples
whipped cream
chocolate shavings
or savory toppings if omitting vanilla and sugar


In a large, oven-safe skillet, add 1/4 c. butter. Preheat oven to 400 F. Add skillet, with butter, to the oven to preheat.

In a large bowl or stand mixer, add eggs. Four eggs will give a more bread-like texture (closer to an American style pancake) and six will give a texture more akin to a Yorkshire pudding or popover. Whisk eggs until uniform, foamy, and slightly lightened in color. Add milk and whisk until smooth. Gradually add flour, whisking to avoid lumps, until fully incorporated. Add salt, sugar (if desired), and vanilla (if desired).

Remove skillet from oven. Butter should be browned and bubbling. Pour batter into skillet and immediately transfer back to the oven to bake for 30 minutes, or until edges are browned and the dutch baby has risen or “poofed” significantly. Let cool about 10 minutes, then slice and add desired toppings. Enjoy warm.


Savory Spring Dutch Baby with Hollandaise


1/4 c. butter
4-6 eggs
1 c. milk
1 c. flour
3/4 t. salt

1 T olive oil
7 stems of kale
1 large leek
fresh herbs of choice (equal to approx. 1/4 c.)
1 oz prosciutto
1/4 c. shaved parmesan
1 recipe hollandaise sauce (see below)
salt and pepper to taste


In a large, oven-safe skillet, add 1/4 c. butter. Preheat oven to 400 F. Add skillet, with butter, to the oven to preheat.

Destem kale, and chop roughly. Set aside. Wash leek and slice into thin rounds, set aside. Destem or chop herbs if needed, then set aside.

In a large bowl or stand mixer, add eggs. Four eggs will give a more bread-like texture (closer to an American style pancake) and six will give a texture more akin to a Yorkshire pudding or popover. Whisk eggs until uniform, foamy, and slightly lightened in color. Add milk and whisk until smooth. Gradually add flour, whisking to avoid lumps, until fully incorporated. Add salt, about 1/3 c. kale, 1/3 c. leeks, and the fresh herbs. Stir until fully incorporated.

Remove skillet from oven. Butter should be browned and bubbling. Pour batter into skillet and quickly use a fork or spatula to distribute greens and herbs evenly in the batter, then immediately transfer back to the oven to bake for 30 minutes. It is done when edges are browned and the dutch baby has risen or “poofed” significantly. During the last 15 minutes of baking, preheat a nonstick skillet to medium-high heat on the stove top. Add a drizzle (about a tablespoon) of olive oil, along with the rest of your kale and leeks. Cover and let cook until leeks are just slightly browned and vegetables are wilted. Add salt and pepper to taste. While vegetables are cooking, make hollandaise sauce. When dutch baby is done, remove from oven and let cool about 10 minutes.

When dutch baby is cooled slightly, top with cooked vegetables then arrange prosciutto on top. Drizzle with hollandaise and sprinkle with parmesan shavings. Serve immediately.


Quick Hollandaise for Two


3 egg yolks (reserve whites for another recipe)
1 T lemon juice, more or less to taste
6 T room temperature butter
1 pinch cayenne pepper


Place egg yolks in a heat safe glass bowl. Add about an inch of water to a medium sized saucepan, then place over medium/high heat. When water just starts to bubble (NOT boil), place the glass bowl with egg yolks over the pan, making sure the base of the pan does not touch the water. Add lemon juice to egg yolks, then whisk yolks until they are slightly foamy and lightened in color. Continue whisking until egg yolks have thickened just slightly, then add butter, two tablespoons at a time until the sauce has thickened significantly and has doubled in volume.

If the water boils at any point, remove the bowl from the pan and reduce the heat before continuing. When sauce reaches desired thickness, remove from heat and add pepper. If sauce sets and becomes too thick, add a tablespoon of warm water and whisk until smooth again. Use immediately.

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