Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer
Recipes,  Sweet

Panna Cotta with Blood Orange and Rosé Gelee 

Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer
Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer
Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer
Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer

Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer

Panna cotta is fancy milk Jell-o.

That’s it. That’s all it is. And it’s almost as easy to make, but way more impressive. If you’re from anywhere in the midwest, you’re probably very familiar with the various Jell-o salad concoctions that end up at the local potlucks. Well, this is easier to make than most of those, but it sounds, and looks, way more sophisticated. And I guess it kind of is, because it’s Italian, and that gives any dish auto-classy points. This particular version could also be classified as a sort of Jell-o shot, if you don’t cook the alcohol out of the wine.

Like I said, classy.

Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer

On a different note, spring is on its way. It doesn’t look like it here yet, with 2 feet of snow on the ground, but I can feel it in my bones. Or maybe I’m just anxious for it. Hard to tell the difference between intuition and cabin fever. Either way, I’m attempting to ring in spring with early season florals in my photos, and it’s making me want to fill every corner of my house with something alive. I’ll probably soon be finding myself in the discount plant section at Lowe’s, bringing home a few too many green blessings.

I’ll be posting a St. Patrick’s day meal on here soon, which I was hoping would be the end of my winter-season-ingredient posts. Eating seasonally is important for the flavor of our dishes, but also the environment and local economy. And I love a lot of winter produce– however, I feel like I’ve been using it exclusively for years now. And with the snow on the ground, it looks like winter produce will be the name of the game a little while longer. So much for a Paddy’s day farewell.

Hello again, citrus and brassicas. You’re time still reigns.

Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer
Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer
Panna Cotta with Blood Orange Gelee from Boiled Wheat Blog by Kristen McSorley, Montana Food Photographer

Panna Cotta with Blood Orange and Rosé Gelee 


For the Panna Cotta:
2 c. heavy cream
1 c. milk
1/3 c. sugar
2 T honey
1 T or 1 packet gelatin powder
pinch of salt

For the Gelee:
2 c. blood orange juice, strained
1 c. Rosé of your choice
1/3 c. sugar
1 T lemon juice (opt)
1 T or 1 packet gelatin powder


For the Panna Cotta:

Pour milk into a medium sized saucepan and add gelatin powder. Mix briskly then wait five minutes for gelatin to soften. Move pan to stovetop and place over medium heat. Bring to a low simmer and stir until gelatin is fully dissolved. Add cream, sugar, honey, and salt, then heat until sugar is dissolved. Do not boil. Let the mixture cool slightly, then pour into serving glasses or molds. Refrigerate until set. For offset design, prop glasses in an empty egg carton.

If using molds (and you want the gelee to be on top), make gelee first, and pour into molds to chill and set before making panna cotta.

For the Gelee:

Pour orange juice into a medium sized saucepan and add gelatin. Mix well and allow gelatin to soften for about five minutes. After a few minutes, bring the pan to a simmer to fully dissolve the gelatin. Add the rosé, sugar, and lemon juice, if desired. Bring to a simmer to fully dissolve sugar, then remove from heat and let sit until cool enough to touch. Pour over set panna cotta and chill until set.

Garnish with blood orange curls or edible flowers, if desired.

*If you want an alcoholic gelee, simmer the sugar in the orange juice and add rosé just before pouring into serving glasses.

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